Category Archives: Education

Turkish schools to stop teaching evolution

Evolution will no longer be taught in Turkish schools, a senior education official has said, in a move likely to raise the ire of the country’s secular opposition.

Alpaslan Durmuş, who chairs the board of education, said evolution was debatable, controversial and too complicated for students. 

“We believe that these subjects are beyond their [students] comprehension,” said Durmuş in a published on the education ministry’s website.

Durmuş said a chapter on evolution was being removed from ninth grade biology course books, and the subject postponed to the undergraduate period. Another change to the curriculum may reduce the amount of time that students spend studying the legacy of secularism.

Critics of the government believe public life is being increasingly stripped of the secular traditions instilled by the nation’s founder, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

The secular opposition has long argued that the government of is pursuing a covert Islamist agenda contrary to the republic’s founding values. Education is a particularly contentious avenue, because of its potential in shaping future generations. Small-scale protests by parents in local schools have opposed the way religion is taught.

There is little acceptance of evolution as a concept among mainstream Muslim clerics in the Middle East, who believe it contradicts the story of creation in scripture, in which God breathed life into the first man, Adam, after shaping him from clay. Still, evolution is briefly taught in many high school biology courses in the region.

The final changes to the curriculum are likely to be announced next week after the Muslim Eid or Bayram festival at the end of the fasting month of Ramadan. The draft changes had been put forth for public consultation at the beginning of the year.

The subject of evolution in particular stirred debate earlier this year after Numan Kurtulmuş, the deputy prime minister,  the process as a theory that was both archaic and lacking sufficient evidence.

in Turkish media in recent weeks, based on apparent leaks of school board meetings, have also predicted a diminished role in the curriculum for the study of Atatürk, and an increase in the hours devoted to studying religion. Durmuş said that a greater emphasis would be placed on the contributions of Muslim and Turkish scientists and history classes would move away from a “Euro-centric” approach.

Many in the religiously conservative element of the president’s support base admire his piety and see his ascension as a defeat of the elite “White Turks” – a westernised elite that used to dominate the upper echelons of society and was accused of looking down with disdain on poorer, more religiously inclined citizens.

Children expelled from English schools

Of those, 1,185 were primary age children, including 475 children who were seven or under, and 50 four-year-olds.

Almost a third of primary exclusions were for assault against an adult, though the most common reason was persistently disruptive behaviour.

Figures released by the Department for Education show that the total number of exclusions went up by just under 1,000 in 2015-16 compared with the previous year – up from 5,795 in 2014/15 to 6,685 – which is the equivalent of 35.2 exclusions a day, up from an average of 30.5.

Teachers’ leaders, seeking to explain the increase, said more children were becoming disengaged from school as the curriculum narrowed, with a growing focus on testing, especially among the youngest children. They also warned about the impact of cuts to the number of teaching assistants, who often support disruptive pupils.

Pupils at secondary school account for eight in 10 of all expulsions (81%); 14-year-olds had the highest number of permanent exclusions at 1,715, with a higher exclusion rate among boys than girls.

Pupils with a black or mixed ethnic background were more likely to be excluded than their white counterparts who, in turn, were more likely to be excluded than children of Chinese and Asian heritage.

Overall, the rate of permanent exclusions is equivalent to 84 pupils per 100,000, up from 74 per 100,000 the previous year. Longer term there has been a generally downward trend since since 2006/07.

The DfE figures also show that the number of temporary or fixed-period exclusions has gone up from almost 303,000 last year to just under 340,000, with increases in both primary and secondary schools.

There was an increase in the proportion of children temporarily excluded in every age group other than among 17-year-olds. However, the rate of exclusion among those aged four and under grew at a faster rate than any other age category, rising from 2,350 in 2014-15 to 3,035 last y

Figures show that almost 25,000 children aged seven or under were temporarily excluded from primary school in 2015/16. More than 15,000 fixed-period exclusions in primary school were for physical assault against an adult. The average length of a fixed suspension was 2.2 days.

Commenting on the figures, Kevin Courtney, general secretary of the National Union of Teachers, said: “This is a concerning trend and the DfE must give serious and honest consideration to what is driving these rising numbers of exclusions.

“NUT members tell us that as the curriculum gets narrower and children’s experience of school is ever more focused on preparation for tests and exams, more students are becoming disengaged from school which in turn leads to problems with behaviour and mental health problems.

“Cuts to school and local authority budgets have led to pastoral and mental health support services being scaled back or axed. Some schools have had to reduce the number of teaching assistants employed. This clearly has an impact on the help schools can give to individual pupils as and when the need arises.”

A DfE spokeswoman said: “We want every child to have access to a good school place where they can learn without disruption and feel safe at school.

“The rules are clear that exclusion powers should only be used in particular circumstances and decisions to exclude should be lawful, reasonable and fair. Permanent exclusion should only be used as a last resort, in response to a serious breach, or persistent breaches, of the school’s behaviour policy.”

A report published by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) this week suggested that half of all pupils expelled from school were suffering from a recognised mental health problem.

Kiran Gill, IPPR associate fellow, said“In the first year of Theresa May’s time in office, 35 children – more than an entire class of students – were permanently excluded from school each day. The majority were excluded just before their GCSEs, and stand a one in 100 chance of gaining the qualifications required by most employers.”

Liberal Democrat education spokesperson Layla Moran added: “A permanent exclusion will have an irreversible impact on a young person’s life chances – and when this is happening to children as young as four, that is a national scandal. Schools need the resources and capacity to give children with behavioural problems the proper support they need.”

New Zealand school where children are free to roam

Deep among the streams and Kauri trees of rural south Auckland, New Zealand’s newest and most alternative school is in session. The weather is fine so a bout of fishing is in order, followed by lunch cooked on an open fire. Homework and classes? Indefinitely dismissed.

“We are called a school but we look nothing like any school out there,” says Joey Moncarz, co-founder and head teacher at Deep Green Bush School, which is in term two of its inaugural year.

“We don’t do things like telling kids it is time to write or learn maths. When they are interested in doing it, they do it.”

Moncarz is an ex-mainstream teacher. After five, frustrating years in mainstream schools in New Zealand he quit to found Deep Green Bush school, which has a roll of eight, and no classroom walls, time-out chairs or tests.

Concerned that mainstream schools were not preparing children for the global problems of the future – such as climate change –Moncarz envisioned a radically different kind of education, rooted in the primal skills of hunting, gathering and survival.

If the weather allows, pupils spend the majority of their day outdoors, exploring the New Zealand bush, learning to fish and hunt, trapping possums (which are considered a pest) and learning about the flora and fauna of their home.

The more traditional school skills, such as reading, writing and arithmetic, are acquired at their own pace, after they begin showing an interest in them. Not, says Moncarz, when the teacher dictates it is time to learn.

 Joey Moncarz and children who attend the Deep Green Bush School in New Zealand. Photograph: Deep Green Bush School

“We don’t have what you’d traditionally consider problem kids,” says Moncarz .

“Our parents saw their kids were unhappy and stressed in mainstream education and they started questioning; is it normal or right for kids to come home stressed and unhappy? Having taught in a mainstream school, I’d say most kids are stressed and unhappy.”

Bush school is registered with the Ministry of Education as an independent school, and therefore does not have to abide by the standard New Zealand curriculum, although it is subject to ministerial oversight.

Loosely inspired by the Sudbury Valley School in the US, which in turn was inspired by A.S Neill’s Summerhill school in the UK, since launching in January Moncarz has been fielding requests from around New Zealand and abroad to open chapters of Bush School in places as far afield as China and Europe.

Dr David Berg, a senior lecturer in education at the University of Otago, says there is a growing precedent for alternative “bush” schools worldwide, especially in Scandinavia, where some kindergarten children go ice-fishing during the school day.

America University Rankings 2017

In calculating the top universities in Latin America, the Times Higher Education Latin America University Rankings 2017 use the same 13 performance indicators as the THE World University Rankings, but they are recalibrated to reflect the qualities of Latin America’s institutions.

The universities are judged across all of their core missions – teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook – to provide the most comprehensive and balanced comparisons available


The institution knocks previous champion and neighbour, the University of São Paulo, down to second place in the THE Latin America University Rankings 2017, thanks to a strong performance in terms of its research influence (citations) and industry income.

However, while Brazil dominates the ranking, claiming two-fifths of places – or 32 out of 81 – only 18 of these make the top 50, down from 23 last year. Overall, 20 Brazilian universities have dropped places.

Marcelo Knobel, rector of the State University of Campinas, said that the rankings results reflected long-term improvements that the institution has made to its research strategy and knowledge transfer efforts over the past 15 years.

He said that the university has a “very selective process in hiring new faculty” and works in close collaboration with businesses on research.

However, he said that the university is struggling financially because of Brazil’s economic crisis.

“Our budget is close to what it was in 2008, but the problem is that the university grew by about 30 per cent in that same period,” he said.

“We have to restrict our investment in new buildings. It will affect the research and the functioning of the university.”

The institution knocks previous champion and neighbour, the University of São Paulo, down to second place in the THE Latin America University Rankings 2017, thanks to a strong performance in terms of its research influence (citations) and industry income.

However, while Brazil dominates the ranking, claiming two-fifths of places – or 32 out of 81 – only 18 of these make the top 50, down from 23 last year. Overall, 20 Brazilian universities have dropped places.

Marcelo Knobel, rector of the State University of Campinas, said that the rankings results reflected long-term improvements that the institution has made to its research strategy and knowledge transfer efforts over the past 15 years.

He said that the university has a “very selective process in hiring new faculty” and works in close collaboration with businesses on research.

However, he said that the university is struggling financially because of Brazil’s economic crisis.

“Our budget is close to what it was in 2008, but the problem is that the university grew by about 30 per cent in that same period,” he said.

“We have to restrict our investment in new buildings. It will affect the research and the functioning of the university.”

Help students become better learners

Encouraging students to build awareness, understanding and control of their thought processes – also known as metacognition – has been identified by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) Toolkit as one of the most cost-effective ways to improve learning. It’s also thought to help boost performance in subjects such as maths, science and English.

It’s all about about getting students to think critically about their own learning. As the EEF explains, learners can be given “specific strategies to set goals and monitor and evaluate their own academic development … the intention is often to give pupils a repertoire of strategies to choose from during learning activities”.

Help students understand the importance of preparation and an effective approach to setting goals. For good goal setting, you need to include a combination of both short-term and long-term goals, focus on developing skills (instead of just desired outcomes) and consider potential obstacles. If students know what challenges may come their way, they should be better equipped to overcome them when the time comes.

It’s hard to manage our emotions and thoughts if we aren’t aware of what we’re thinking and feeling. Self-awareness doesn’t always come easily for students because their brains are going through a range of changes during their teenage years.

Research shows, however, that self-awareness can be developed by encouraging students to keep a diary. Evidence also suggests that writing a diary can actually improve physical health and mental wellbeing. It can help students to spot any trends and patterns, making it easier to manage emotions and choose effective thought processes before they get stressed about more difficult tasks.

If a task can be divided into the three stages of before, during and after then it’s possible to help students improve their metacognition by getting them to ask themselves good questions at each stage.

Before a task, this includes questions such as “Is this similar to previous tasks I’ve done?” and “What should I do first?” During a task, questions such as “Am I on the right track?’ and “Who can I ask for help?” ensure students monitor their performance and make adjustments if necessary. Finally, after a task, students can reflect and learn on their experiences by asking “What went well?”, “What do I need to improve on?” and “What would I do differently next time?”

Being exposed to a range of different thought processes gives students a larger variety of potential thinking strategies. Try modelling or talking through your thoughts when going through questions in a past exam paper, for example.

Evidence suggests that this strategy is currently under-used, with one studyfinding that “in 170 hours of observation, only one instance of a teacher modelling her thinking about reading or writing was recorded, and this was unplanned”. The approach may be effective because it avoids any ambiguity and allows students to tap into your expert knowledge and experience.

Turkish schools to stop teaching evolution

Evolution will no longer be taught in Turkish schools, a senior education official has said, in a move likely to raise the ire of the country’s secular opposition.

Alpaslan Durmuş, who chairs the board of education, said evolution was debatable, controversial and too complicated for students. 

“We believe that these subjects are beyond their [students] comprehension,” said Durmuş in a video published on the education ministry’s website.

Durmuş said a chapter on evolution was being removed from ninth grade biology course books, and the subject postponed to the undergraduate period. Another change to the curriculum may reduce the amount of time that students spend studying the legacy of secularism.

Critics of the government believe public life is being increasingly stripped of the secular traditions instilled by the nation’s founder, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk.

The secular opposition has long argued that the government of Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is pursuing a covert Islamist agenda contrary to the republic’s founding values. Education is a particularly contentious avenue, because of its potential in shaping future generations. Small-scale protests by parents in local schools have opposed the way religion is taught.

There is little acceptance of evolution as a concept among mainstream Muslim clerics in the Middle East, who believe it contradicts the story of creation in scripture, in which God breathed life into the first man, Adam, after shaping him from clay. Still, evolution is briefly taught in many high school biology courses in the region.

The final changes to the curriculum are likely to be announced next week after the Muslim Eid or Bayram festival at the end of the fasting month of Ramadan. The draft changes had been put forth for public consultation at the beginning of the year.

The subject of evolution in particular stirred debate earlier this year after Numan Kurtulmuş, the deputy prime minister, described the process as a theory that was both archaic and lacking sufficient evidence.

Reports in Turkish media in recent weeks, based on apparent leaks of school board meetings, have also predicted a diminished role in the curriculum for the study of Atatürk, and an increase in the hours devoted to studying religion. Durmuş said that a greater emphasis would be placed on the contributions of Muslim and Turkish scientists and history classes would move away from a “Euro-centric” approach.

The changes were based on a broad public consultation in which parents and the public played a key role, he said.

The Islamist-secularist debate is just one of a series of divides in a country that two months ago narrowly approved a referendum granting President Erdoğan broad new powers.

Many in the religiously conservative element of the president’s support base admire his piety and see his ascension as a defeat of the elite “White Turks” – a westernised elite that used to dominate the upper echelons of society and was accused of looking down with disdain on poorer, more religiously inclined citizens.

Tackle sexual harassment on campus

Generation Z is starting university – but is higher education ready?

At the University of Salford, we’ve sought to respond to this agenda through the launch of ProtectED – a national university membership and accreditation scheme for student safety, security and wellbeing. The ProtectED code of practicecontains measures on university security; mental health and wellbeing; international student safety; the student night out; and harassment and sexual assault, all of which embed the taskforce recommendations. Member universities must implement all these measures to achieve accreditation, which is verified by trained assessors.

To develop the code, the Salford team of academics reviewed current best practice and university initiatives, surveyed 870 university students, and held discussion groups with students’ union sabbatical officers, police higher education liaison officers, and university security managers.

The student survey yielded the alarming findings that 90% of sexual assault victims hadn’t informed the police and 86% chose not to tell their university. Several responses echoed one individual’s sentiments: “[The assault] didn’t seem severe enough”. Others hinted at a culture of acceptance [pdf] around the issue: “I am referring to drunk individuals within nightclubs and it happens often but is not very serious.” Universities such as Worcester, Kent and Canterbury Christ Church have responded by developing bystander trainingwhich will help students recognise sexual harassment and abuse, understand that it is unacceptable, and give them the skills and confidence to respond appropriately. Sharing their work will enable other universities to replicate their good work.

The ProtectED survey also accentuated the importance of offering peer support – another accreditation requirement – as all students who experienced a sexual assault confided in their friends over the police, university and their families. Liverpool John Moores University will train student safeguarding champions to encourage reporting and provide approachable access to support and advice.

One survey respondent who did speak to their university explains: “No follow up made. Security laughed when I reported the assault.” This is why ProtectED requires universities to have a written policy on student harassment and sexual assault, covering staff and student perpetrators. Having a formal approach to promoting zero-tolerance, staff training, and reporting and recording methods will help ensure a more effective and uniform response. For example, Middlesex University, is creating a toolkit with students to ensure staff are absolutely clear on their role in supporting students and preventing abuse.

In ProtectED focus group sessions, university security managers rated sexual assault and harassment as having the greatest impact on universities, and provided anecdotal accounts of universities not recording incidents to minimise reputational damage

One security manager observed of their university: “If the university publicly acknowledged the problem, then – unless every university does it – it makes it look like there’s a specific issue with [x university] and their sexual harassment problem. And I think they think it will impact on prospective students. I don’t think it does. I personally think that I’d rather the university … put their hands up and be like, ‘This is an issue. We’re tackling it’.”

Data collection is vital to understanding the problem. Achieving ProtectED accreditation also means collecting and sharing student harassment and sexual assault data with ProtectED. This is anonymised, aggregated and used to inform research to benefit member institutions. To enable data collection and support students, universities need to provide accessible, user-friendly reporting methods. The University of Loughborough and the University of Cambridge will create anonymous online reporting systems to minimise discomfort for victims.

Meanwhile the University of Portsmouth is also using funds from the Higher Education Funding Council for England for a range of training and awareness-raising initiatives, they will crucially focus on staff-to-student sexual harassment. Dr Anna Bull will lead in this area, drawing on her work with the 1752 Group.

The government funded-pilots are a good start in getting to grips with student harassment and sexual assault, but attitudes and responses still vary widely across the sector — an unsettling prospect for students and their families. If universities are to respond effectively, they must collaborate to share their experiences, expertise and resources. ProtectED provides a forum for them to do so.

Creativity from the computer departement

For one thing, most of our staff have creative practices outside of, but frequently related to computing: they’re musicians, artists, social activists, and writers. If someone was wandering around the corridors and asked to guess what kind of academic department we’re in, they probably wouldn’t guess computing. But we are computer scientists, honest. The work we do is significant on the world stage, published in the best journals and presented at the best conferences.

We built a computing department that played to Goldsmiths’ core strengths in arts and social analyses and critiques

Lots of what we do involves integrating ideas across different disciplines and world views. In one project with Imperial College, we are helping people understand the way proteins dock. This could be a dry subject, but we use techniques from games and 3D digital art to produce visualisations for scientists and to aid pupils’ learning. In another, we are helping people collectively learn how to play music using a hybrid of audio-visual and social media techniques. In a third, we put an enormous man-made sun in the middle of Trafalgar Square. We also designed software with embedded machine learning, enabling users to build their own real-time interactive systems, including musical instruments.

 

Brillint. Independent. Unusually diverse. We draw a lot of our students from London and we naturally inherit a great deal of cultural diversity from the city. We are particularly proud of the prominence of women in the department. We have more than twice the average percentage of women on our degree courses, but we can and will do better.

We have a women in computing scholarship scheme for undergraduates, and we run events in our welcome week for new female students. We are active in national networks for women in Stem subjects, and our head of department is one of the two co-chairs of the Goldsmiths Athena SWAN team, working to ensure gender equality across the institution.

How else do you try to broaden the reach of computing education?

We have a mission to widen access both locally and globally. Locally, we work with London schools and further education colleges to enable inner-city pupils to find their way to university.

Globally, we have been working on distance learning initiatives for over 20 years. We are the provider of the undergraduate computing programmes for the University of London International Academy. Through that, we have educated thousands of students around the world.

Over the last few years, that global reach imperative has led us increasingly down a path of online provision. We have run Moocs (massive open online courses) on a number of platforms, teaching subjects stretching from data science to deep stack web development, and machine learning for artists. These have already reached over 200,000 learners. We expect this to grow quickly and are now expanding the department to help support the growth.

What online provision have you got coming up?

We are very excited about our next Mooc, which we think will be one of the world’s first to cover virtual reality. This will be led by our lecturer Dr Sylvia Xueni Pan.

Sylvia is a good example of the kind of lecturers we have. Growing up in Beijing, she went on to do a PhD and post-doctoral research in virtual reality at UCL, then joined us at Goldsmiths.

She’s interested in creating empathic social experiences in VR that are immersive and engaging, and she uses these experiences in training and education, therapy, and social neuroscience research. She has, for example, been using VR to train GPs to deal with (virtual) patients’ unreasonable demands for antibiotics. She also uses VR as a research tool for social scientists, and brings social science research to VR.

Her work has been featured in BBC Horizon, New Scientist and the Wall Street Journal. All of this thinking will inform the VR section soon to appear on the online study site, Coursera.

How did you get to be the department yo?

The department development began in 2001 when the idea of “the digital” was all over Goldsmiths, as it was all over everywhere else. It seemed a great time to build a computing department that played to Goldsmiths’ core strengths in arts and social analyses and critiques. So that’s what we did. We started joint research, and teaching programmes jointly. It has worked well for us and we are now deeply embedded in all Goldsmiths’ activities.

This worldview still affects much of what we do: as we expand the kinds of computing we explore, we retain a focus on arts, creativity and the social. Therefore, our two newest growth areas – virtual reality and data science – both embrace ideas from, and applications to, arts and social science.

 

The school where cuts are pushing teachers

Thursday morning. Ordinarily, this leafy street in south Londonwould be teeming with life, as boys clad in black blazers and striped ties make their way to school. Today, the road is uncharacteristically quiet.

It is the 13th day of strike action since November by teachers at Forest Hill School for Boys in Lewisham, and most of the 1,400 pupils are at home again. Their teachers are protesting against staff cuts designed to save the school £1.3m. Fifteen teaching jobs are being cut from September, more than 20 support staff have already gone, and the head teacher is now grappling with a rash of resignations from disillusioned teachers who want out.

A small group of striking teachers gather at the school gate. A few boys amble into the building for year 10 exams, music practice or a trip to Whitstable, as a van arrives with placards and a union banner is unfurled. The mood is subdued but picks up when someone finds the megaphone. The chants begin and energy levels lift: “No ifs, no buts, no Forest Hill cuts”; “They say cutback, we say fight back”; and “Not our deficit, it’s our school, don’t mess with it.”

Earlier in the dispute, the protests to highlight the plight of the school were bigger, but as the end of term approaches, numbers have diminished. Today, the gathering of staff is bolstered by a few parents who turn out in support – some with children – and there are regular toots from passing vehicles.

“It’s a fantastic school,” says Jacqueline Morrish, who has a son in year 9 and has turned out this morning to support his teachers. “It’s been brilliant. They treat the boys really well, and they flourish.” One father, whose 15-year-old son is one of the few attending school today, is also fully behind the striking teachers: “My boy is on the autistic spectrum. They are very good with special needs. That’s why he’s here. It’s been excellent.”

Teaching unions say the crisis is the result of years of frozen budgets, further eroded by higher pension, wage and tax costs, as well as inflation. As a result, the National Audit Office (NAO) calculates that schools are facing a £3bn real-terms cut in funding by 2019, with more schools going into deficit as a result. NAO figures show that the proportion of local authority-maintained secondary schools spending more than their income increased from 34% in 2010/11 to 59% in 2014-15, while the average size of deficit increased from £246,000 to £326,000 during the same period.

The growing schools funding crisisbecame a key issue in the general election campaign, forcing the Tory government to listen to parents’ and teachers’ concerns. On Monday, the education secretary Justine Greening announced an additional £1.3bn in schools’ funding to try to ease the pressure on budgets and placate angry parents. Teachers’ leaders say it is nowhere near enough. Given the scale of the deficit at Forest Hill, it is unlikely to have any immediate impact on the current crisis facing the school. Meanwhile, uncertainty remains over plans to reform the way in which schools are funded nationally, which could still have an additional impact on London schools.

Founded in 1956, Forest Hill school has been a popular, successful and highly regarded boys’ comprehensive that has served its diverse local community well. The original London county council brick structure has been replaced in the last decade with a modern PFI-funded building, which is shrouded in a distinctive palette of yellow and gold panels and cost £23.5m. The school’s reputation has been one of high achievement and inclusivity, catering for students of all backgrounds and abilities; its record on pastoral care and special educ

Students from Cuba is a sign of changes at the Open University

Cuba Solidarity is rightly leading protests at the banning of applications from Cuban students by the Open University. It has been policy for a while now that the OU does not accept applications from Syria, Sudan, Iran, Cuba and North Korea, because of the fear of US sanctions. So inclusivity and openness are now at risk on an international scale, which comes as no surprise to many of us employed by or associated with the Open University. This discriminatory policy comes with a context. The OU has form on producing progressive rhetoric when the reality of their strategies has for some years been a carnival of reaction. My central and regional colleagues have witnessed with dismay the loss of local offices, along with experienced and skilled student and tutor support staff, since the closure of my regional centre in the south-east in 2014. Many of the support staff are women who have been forced to take early retirement or voluntary redundancy – more effective discrimination. We were told by senior management that these closures were not to save money but to modernise and digitalise the institution. But fiascos have ensued in administrative processes, seriously disadvantaging students and overworking part- and full-time academic and administrative teams. The fall in student recruitment and retention is not just because of the huge hike in fees the OU put into place under the Tory coalition.

Fees Fees vary. The fee for a standard 30-credit module in England is £1,432, and for a standard 60-credit module it’s £2,864. Most students study 60 credits per year over six years for an honours degree.

Fees vary if you are overseas and are lower in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales.

Scotland: If your personal income is £25,000 or less, or you’re on certain benefits, you could qualify for the part-time fee grant to cover 100% of your course fees. It’s not a loan – you won’t need to pay it back.

Wales: Dependent on your income and level of study you may be eligible for a course grant of up to £1,155 to help you pay for course-related costs. This is in addition to the part-time tuition fee loan which can pay for you fees. There’s nothing to pay upfront and you only start paying back when you earn more than £21,000.

Northern Ireland: For the 2017-18 academic year funding options in NI are changing. The current system of non-repayable fee and course grant support will continue to be available for those in receipt of state benefits or who have a low household income. In addition to this, a part-time tuition fee loan, which can be use used as a top-up to the fee grant is being introduced and will add to the range of payment options available for self-funding students. The application processes for fee grants and loans will open on 11 June.